dictator-princess asked:

Hello! I was wondering, as I have a character who deteriorates as my story progresses (physically, mentally, and emotionally) and I've noticed that I'm rather terrible at making said deterioration slow and gradual, if you had any advice as to how to make the process subtle? The story is written from his point of view, and I'm having a bit of difficulty not rushing it entirely. If you answer this, thank you very much.

fixyourwritinghabits:

Hello (:

When you deteriorate, in any way, you feel, do things, and connect differently. When this process is slow, your characters will change the way they connect with their surroundings.

This is a hard question to answer because, we all go through different situations and we all react differently towards them. I’ll do what I probably shouldn’t do, answering this question from a personal experience. Not for you to write in your story but to take as a possible guide.

Because not everyone is interested in this subject, because some people don’t want to discuss this matter, and because I’ve never told anyone about it, below there’s the information.

Read More

Anonymous asked:

What would be the best way to capture someone who is a skilled, experienced fighter with a very high pain tolerance?

howtofightwrite:

A tazer. It doesn’t matter how badass your character thinks they are, when your nervous system is shorted out by an electrical current, you cannot fight.

After that, anything you can use to cripple them quickly, like a crowbar or sledgehammer to the knee will work.

Pointing a gun at their head along with with ten or twenty of your buddies and giving them a choice between becoming the new flavor of chunky salsa sweetmeat or coming quietly is probably your best bet.

If that fails, numbers will end your lone experienced fighter. It doesn’t matter if you’re Jack Bauer or Chuck Norris, you cannot fight a crowd. Combat experience and training can give you the tools to briefly juggle a few people, effectively, but the key word there is, “briefly.”

It doesn’t matter how awesome or badass you think your character is, they can’t take a crowd and win.

Pain tolerance only keeps them going when they’ve suffered an injury that doesn’t actually impair their ability to fight. But, when you’re receiving injuries that are going to make fighting impossible, like breaking an arm, for example, the pain isn’t actually important. You can’t use that arm, no matter how strong your will to fight is.

You can’t make a character superhuman without actually saying, “screw this, I’m giving them superpowers.” The way you take out a lone combatant is basically going to be the same. Overwhelm them.

-Starke

Anonymous asked:

do you have any resources on deaf muses/characters? please and thank you!

rphelper:

First let me clarify that you should say “characters who are deaf/hard of hearing.” It’s an honest and very common mistake (even amongst those who are deaf), but people-first language is important. Just doing my part in letting you know! :~)

Here are some resources:

As for my unsolicited writing advice: please be sure to make your character more than just “the deaf character.” Give them interests, goals, motivations, fears, and a personality just like you would any other character. They are a character who just happens to be deaf. This part of them will impact their background and personality significantly, but don’t make it all they are about.

I hope this helps!

sixpenceee:

Brain injury can result from various things:
head trauma from car accidents
stroke (when an artery in the brain ruptures)
anoxia (loss of oxygen supply to brain)
poisoning (binge drinking) 
A coma is when a patient cannot be roused. The body continues to exhibit reactions however. For example, in coma patients, reflexes such as gagging and pupil contraction retain present. This means that atleast the unconscious circuitry in the brain is working. 
A coma can lead to 4 things
Fast Recovery: exactly what it sounds like, the patient is conscious once more
Vegetative State: there is no responsiveness, although the patient can now exhibit complex reflexes such as yawning and eye movements. The patient might even smile, cry or frown with no obvious cause. Neurologists consider this behavior reflexive, as the spinal cord may generate involuntary movements 
Locked In Syndrome: a condition in which a patient is aware but cannot move or communicate verbally due to complete paralysis of nearly all voluntary muscles in the body except for the eyes
Brain death: total absence of brain stem reflexes. There is a flat EEG line and the patient can’t breathe. Neurons start to degenerate quickly and melt away. Currently this step is irreversible. Most countries identify brain death with death. 
A vegetative step can lead to two things
Minimally conscious state: characterized by some evidence of awareness of self and/or the environment. During some periods they can maintain control of their actions. They can respond to a verbal order and follow a mirror with their eye. Their behavior can be variable. Some days they will show signs of being aware and others days not at all. 
Permanent Vegetative State: implies lack of recovery and a prolonged vegetative state. In rare cases there will be conscious but uncommunicating patients. See below. 
THE VEGETATIVE PATIENT WHO COULD TALK TO DOCTORS
SOURCE: Consciousness & The Brain by Stanislas Dehaene 

sixpenceee:

Brain injury can result from various things:

  • head trauma from car accidents
  • stroke (when an artery in the brain ruptures)
  • anoxia (loss of oxygen supply to brain)
  • poisoning (binge drinking) 

A coma is when a patient cannot be roused. The body continues to exhibit reactions however. For example, in coma patients, reflexes such as gagging and pupil contraction retain present. This means that atleast the unconscious circuitry in the brain is working. 

A coma can lead to 4 things

  • Fast Recovery: exactly what it sounds like, the patient is conscious once more
  • Vegetative State: there is no responsiveness, although the patient can now exhibit complex reflexes such as yawning and eye movements. The patient might even smile, cry or frown with no obvious cause. Neurologists consider this behavior reflexive, as the spinal cord may generate involuntary movements 
  • Locked In Syndrome: a condition in which a patient is aware but cannot move or communicate verbally due to complete paralysis of nearly all voluntary muscles in the body except for the eyes
  • Brain death: total absence of brain stem reflexes. There is a flat EEG line and the patient can’t breathe. Neurons start to degenerate quickly and melt away. Currently this step is irreversible. Most countries identify brain death with death. 

A vegetative step can lead to two things

  • Minimally conscious state: characterized by some evidence of awareness of self and/or the environment. During some periods they can maintain control of their actions. They can respond to a verbal order and follow a mirror with their eye. Their behavior can be variable. Some days they will show signs of being aware and others days not at all. 
  • Permanent Vegetative State: implies lack of recovery and a prolonged vegetative state. In rare cases there will be conscious but uncommunicating patients. See below. 

THE VEGETATIVE PATIENT WHO COULD TALK TO DOCTORS

SOURCE: Consciousness & The Brain by Stanislas Dehaene 

(via clevergirlhelps)

A (Fantasy) Cliche/World Building Rant

thewritingcafe:

Because I love fantasy, but I’m not loving cliched/bland/unrealistic worlds. Under the cut you will find:

  1. I Love Your Bracelet. Where Did You Get It?
  2. This Generic Medieval Anglo-Saxon World is Bland
  3. No Change
  4. The Seven Kingdoms
  5. I Know Everyone Has Had Cheese Pizza, but This One Has Green Peppers
  6. Fables, Fairy Tales, Folklore, and Superstitions Are Never Wrong
  7. Evil Uncles
  8. Warriors Don’t Die Quiet Deaths
  9. The Common Tongue

Read More

(via characterandwritinghelp)

pumpkinspiceaddiction asked:

I'm so glad you started this blog because I had questions and I didn't know where to go to ask them!!!! Okay so first-- one of my main characters is a black woman (who is the love interested/best friend to my main-main character, another woman) and the way I'm imagining her hair is like Brandy's in the 90s, with tons of tiny braids but all ending in some kind of adornment, and I wanted to have a scene where, on the road, the main character helps her do her hair and I was wondering if you (cont)

writingwithcolor:

have any guides for writing a scene like that, styling natural hair, etc. Also, my story is set in a fictional fantasy world that has a medieval feeling, but of course I want to diffuse it with lots of diversity and so I have royal family who I want to physically resemble East Asian people and I’m having trouble wondering how to describe their features respectfully, in a manner that would allow the reader to recognize what they are supposed to look like, without using insensitive cliches.
Black & Asian Characters:
Micro Braids & Describing East Asian People
Brandy in the 90s, huh? Then I take it you’re thinking these?

image

These, my friend, are micro braids. Also called invisible & mini-braids. And they’re a beautiful, exhausting process. Ah, childhood…well, least a full head can take up to 8-12 hours, depending on how fast/slow your braider is.
Note: this post is specific to micro braids but some aspects are applicable to other braids.
With two fast-braiding people working on my hair it was usually 4-6 hours, so about half that time. With just one person who’s fast, maybe 8-9. So basically you’re talking nearly a whole day to sit and get these done.(Some micro braids are only braided at the roots and the rest is left loose so those are quicker) How good is your heroine at braiding?
Process of micro braids

These babies hurt. Well, if they braid tight, which they kinda have to. Depending on how kind the hands that do her hair is, her head will be throbbing/itchy after getting them done for like 2-3+ days.

Depending on how thick her hair is, when her hair is brushed out to braid, she’s gonna be wincing, hissing and maybe crying a little (or maybe i’m a wimp). The less dense and tangled her hair is, though, the less pain, wincing, crying etc. (Needless to say, mine is dense.) She could add moisture or oil to make it more bearable in the process, though.  
Braids in general are a great protective style (so they’re pretty adventure-proof) so when you take them down after a month or so, depending on how well she took care of them, her natural hair should’ve grown a lot since.

Note: micro braids typically require extensions added to the natural hair to avoid dreading.

Maintenance of micro braids

To keep braids fresh, she could spritz them with leave-in conditioner and oils. She’d only have to wash her hair once a week or so and it’s done gently. Also, keep them edges oiled and moisturized! Don’t want any breakage.

She could also go swimming without fear, but be prepared for the aftereffects of a fuzzy head. As in hair gettin “frizzy” at the roots quicker. I’m sure redoing most of the scalp braids could fix that or some sort of gel, though i’m not sure what sort of gelling product would be available in your medieval-esque setting. You could be creative about that, though.
Styling of Micro Braids
Well, they can be curled, crimped…also you could take the already braided hair and make bigger braids to style and twist in different ways..
Check out these links for more info on styles and micro braided hair.

Working this into your story

We wonder if, for your setting, these braids would be practical for the time-span it takes to even get them done, least on the road as your characters are. Especially when you have the adornments at the end, which is gonna add an hour or so alone to get on every strand.

Perhaps it’s plausible if she got them done prior in a sit-down setting with a stretch of time available to her, though. Not sure how long they’re on the road, though.

Idea: perhaps have her lover/best friend add the adorns to her hair on the road with the braiding done prior. Might still take a while, but less of a while.

Since this is a medieval setting, you might need to get creative with the tools one would use to add certain beads and adornments. I’m sure there’s some modern equivalent you could come up with and/or existed.

We invite folks with micro braid experience to chime in on this!

Describing East Asian features
Don’t overgeneralize—yes, there are some features that the majority of East Asians will have, such as dark hair and dark eyes, but maybe mention monolids in some characters (instead of just saying their eyes are small, since I have monolids and my eyes aren’t THAT small). You might want to stay away from skin tone, though, since as it’s been pointed out, East Asians can be pale and dark-skinned. 
If there’s any other things East Asian followers can think of, please feel free to contribute!
-Mods: Colette, Najela and Jess

Eyes

the-right-writing:

For some reason, teenage authors have this weird obsession with eyes. Though this is stereotypically linked to teenage girls, teenagers of any gender (and even some adults who are new to writing) can have this problem. Here are some of the main ways this problem manifests and how to avoid them.

First of all, eyes have a very distinctive look. Nobody is going to confuse them for anything else. “I thought I was looking into the deep, stormy ocean, but it turned out I was only gazing into my lover’s eyes” doesn’t happen in real life. “His eyes were as deep as the ocean and revealed his stormy temperament” might work, but actual confusion won’t. 

Eye color is not the first thing people notice when they meet each other unless one of them has rainbow sclerae or something else alien. Clothing, hair, posture, and skin all stand out more. Similarly, people will not be able to see eye color from far away since eyes are small. 

Eye color only needs to be mentioned once unless it’s plot important.

"Eye" and "eyeball" are perfectly fine words (though the second is a bit more medical sounding). They do not need to be replaced with "orb" or "sphere" or "pool." 

Comparing eyes to jewels is a cliche that comes off as amateurish. 

I really agree with this. I just want to put in my two cents. From recent experience, when you end up staring at someone you like, lover or crush, you don’t always focus on eyes. Or even facial features. Sometimes, at least in my experience (which I shall stress everyone may experience this very differently), you can just get caught up in the moment, not actually taking time to figure out everything about their physical appearance.

Suddenly you’re staring and you just get stuck there, not really realizing anything else. Sometimes not even realizing your staring. You just…are. Then again, I may be sounding cliche myself. It could be different if you’re closer. Also, if you’re looking for something physical, such as a kiss, you’ll probably be much more attentive to the lips (or whatever body part, hands, etc) more than eyes.

(via clevergirlhelps)